Ranking

EMBAs are a particularly prestigious element of the business education landscape. While their exact definition can be contentious (some courses which are EMBAs may be called ‘Executive Masters’, for example), what effective EMBAs have in common is that their students should have considerably more work experience than the average among traditional MBA programs. These degrees are aimed for professionals further along in their career, with most EMBAs having both higher fees than their non-Executive alternatives and classes with more than 10 years’ average work experience. QS published the first edition of its Global EMBA Rankings in 2017.

Eligibility

Aside from the ‘sense test’ of ensuring that the programme is recruiting students with significantly more work experience than average, EMBAs must meet the following criteria to be considered for the rankings;

  • The course must have had at least one graduating class.
  • The school providing the course must have accreditation from at least one of the following sources – AACSB, AMBA, EQUIS, or EPAS.

Indicators

Employer Index 25%
Academic Index 25%
Years of Work Experience 5%
Management Experience 5%
C-Suite Experience 5%
Previous Salary 5%
Number of Nationalities 5%
Female Representation 5%
Salary Uplift 10%
Promoted 10%

Methodology

The QS Global EMBA Rankings are made up of 10 indicators:

  • Employer Index - 25%

    This index is derived from data collected in the QS Global Employer Survey. Employers who state that they recruit MBAs are asked, first unprompted and then from a list of business schools, to list institutions whose MBA graduates they consider attractive hiring prospects. The school receiving the most nominations by these employers is given an index score of 25, and the remaining schools have their nominations indexed against this.

  • Academic Index - 25%

    This index is derived from data collected in the QS Global Academic Survey. Academics who have stated their areas of expertise (as being relevant to business and management are asked to list up to 10 domestic and 30 international institutions (other than their own) which they consider excellent for research in their field. These nominations are coupled with an analysis of a school’s faculty citations per paper, and the Hirsch Index of publication productivity and impact. Like the Employer Index, the best performing school is given an index score of 25 and the remaining schools are indexed against it.

  • Years of Work Experience - 5%

    This indicator is derived from the class average of pre-EMBA years of work experience, which. The highest average amount of work experience is given an index score of 5, and the remaining schools are indexed against this.

  • Management Experience - 5%

    This indicator is derived from the class average of pre-EMBA years of management experience. As a ‘sense test’ the maximum class average for years of pre-EMBA management experience is tied to 80% of the class average for years of pre-EMBA work experience as a whole. The highest average is given an index score of 5, and the remaining schools are indexed against this.

  • C-Suite Experience - 5%

    This indicator considers the proportion of an EMBA class that have C-Suite experience. The highest proportion of a class with C-Suite experience is given an index score of 5, and the remaining schools are indexed against this.

  • Previous Salary - 5%

    This indicator is based on the average salary of students prior to their enrolling in an EMBA program. All salaries are converted to US$ (using exchange rates from January 1st of the year the ranking was published). The highest average salary is given an index score of 5, and the remaining schools are indexed against this.

  • Number of Nationalities - 5%

    This indicator checks the number of nationalities represented among an EMBA’s students. To avoid giving smaller EMBA programs an unfair disadvantage, there is a maximum adjustment of 15 nationalities. The programs with the highest number of nationalities are given an index score of 5, and the remaining schools are indexed against them. Where information on number of nationalities is entirely unavailable, the proportion of international students in an EMBA class is used as a stand-in.

  • Female Representation - 5%

    This indicator checks the proportion of female students enrolled in an EMBA program. A proportion of 50% or higher female students in an EMBA class results in a maximum score. The highest scoring schools are given an index score of 5, and the remaining schools are indexed against this.

  • Salary Uplift - 10%

    This indicator examines the average growth of student salaries 12 months after completion of an EMBA. The proportional increase in salary is calculated against the data used for the ‘Previous Salary’ indicator. The highest average proportion of salary increase is given an index score of 10, and the remaining programs are indexed against this.

  • Promoted - 10%

    This indicator examines the proportion of EMBA students who received a promotion within 12 months of completing their course. The highest proportion of promoted EMBA graduates is given an index score of 10, and the remaining schools are indexed against this.

Note: Aside from the Employer Index and Academic Index, which are based on data obtained from QS’ Global Employer and Global Academic surveys, all indicators are based on data provided by business schools or (if no data is provided) from publicly available sources.

All indicator index scores are added together to produced Overall scores, which are ranked and then split into the following categories:

North America

Europe

Asia-Pacific

Latin America

Global Joint EMBAs