Posts

reimagine

In with the new and out with old? Or lessons learnt from the past? Remembering and Re-imagining Education

In light of the upcoming Re-imagine Education Awards, the innovative global competition launched last year by QS and the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania to find the world’s top higher education pedagogical innovation. I started reminiscing about my own university experience, and one particular course came to mind when I looked closely at Hybrid Learning. At QSIU, we are proud to have a team with a diverse skill set, a range of over 12 languages, and have come from various different universities from around the world. Below is an account of a few QSIU team members who share their own memorable experience of past pedagogical methods that have been particularly effective.

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Revealing trends from Google on university-related web searches.

According to a recent BBC news story[1], the Internet giant Google has published its Top 20 most searched universities by Google users worldwide for 2014. The two main trends revealed by this latest list are not only interesting but also thought provoking.

First and foremost, we are witnessing a clear and significant increase in MOOCs popularity. The leading MOOCs providers such as Coursera or edX have been registering online visitors to their websites well above and beyond many traditional and leading institutions such as the University of Cambridge. These platforms, present users with the opportunity to learn and acquire skills and knowledge by reputable institutions while at the same time offer a great deal of flexibility and personal input for each of the users – students. It is certainly not surprising that modern advances in education have made MOOCs popular, reliable and in many cases a preferred alternative to further study overall, especially in times where disposable income for many may be an issue. It also appears that MOOCs and their potential will soon ripen as a field of academic competition and it will be very exciting to see how the top universities in the world will adapt and follow this specific trend.

The second major trend revealed is that Universities no longer rely on the Internet merely for filling in their news feed and sharing important updates, but as the context of educational services becomes even more internationalised and diverse, they begin to adjust their websites for recruiting and attracting international talent. Many of the websites now feature virtual tours, informative videos, advanced graphics and layouts, while more and more departments and schools within the universities are moving to modernise their respective web pages. This is not only due to technological advancements that allow this changes to take place, but it stems primarily by the way we are experiencing and accessing information in the current age, where one institution’s website is in effect its public face.

For more information you can access the full article here.


[1] http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-29240959

in

Indian government takes a closer look at university rankings

 

By John O’Leary

The Indian government is taking increased interest in QS rankings as the company begins to develop a ratings system for the country’s universities.

Ben Sowter, head of the QS Intelligence Unit, which is responsible for the company’s rankings, met Omita Paul, Secretary to the Indian President, with representatives of the Indian Centre for Assessment and Accreditiation (ICAA) in Delhi last month. The hour-long meeting at Rashtrapati Bhavan was the first for any rankings agency. Read more

University

Global geographies of higher education: The perspective of world university rankings

Over the past decade, annually published world university rankings have captured the attention of university managers, policy makers, employers, academics and the wider public. Many national governments have implemented neoliberal reforms in higher education and increased the autonomy of their universities to enhance international competitiveness. Several universities have adjusted their strategic plans to climb up the ranks, while fee-paying international students often consult such league tables as a guide of where they can expect to receive ‘value for money’.

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International students: where do they go?

Internationalisation in higher education is a trend that is only showing growth. This  progression is powered by increased collaborations among world universities and increased international mobility of students. In the last 10 years alone, international students doubled in number, a growth that exceeds the growth of the world population over the same period. They are attracted to top universities around the world, and no longer confined to the “old world” as a destination for their academic endeavours.  Today, more students travel to pursue their studies abroad in a far more diversified portfolio of study destinations.

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