jantofg_TcBlog3_MOOC_7

MOOCs: The Global Employer Perception

Graduate Recruiter October 2014 cover

The Association of Graduate Recruiters(AGR) is an employer-led membership organisation, whose goal is to ensure that all member organisations can recruit and develop the best student talent for their needs and the needs of the UK economy.

With a diverse network of over 700 members, they work closely with employers, the education sector, and supplier partners to represent big employers in the UK.

They invited me to contribute to a special piece on their magazine on the latest IT used in the world of graduate recruitment: Graduate Recruiter. This magazine is published every two months, and is considered as “an essential guide to the latest developments and innovations in graduate recruitment”.The article is published in the October issue of 2014. Here is the original article submit.

You can read the online version of the magazine here. It is on page 22-23. There is a scanned version of the page.

employer page 29-30 MOOCS

According to the latest research from QS, out of 4897 employers 71% said they were not familiar with MOOCS That the QS Global Employer Survey covers nearly 28, 000 employers from 24 major industries within 134 countries the world over, the findings point to a challenging scenario and signal that the growth curve of MOOCS within the mind of industry is yet to occur. More detailed on the survey responses can be obtained by emailing Dr. Christina Yan Zhang, China Director, QS Intelligence Unit at Christina@qs.com.

The findings further revealed that:

1. On average, currently only 29% (less than 1/3) of employers surveyed are aware of or familiar with MOOCs.

Figure 1: Of all the employers who responded to the question “Are you aware of/ familiar with MOOCs”, more than 2/3 responded negatively.
MOOC figure 1

2. Employers consider MOOCS as a valid form for professional development.

Indeed, here the figures yield more promise in that 82% of the 884 employers surveyed globally view MOOCs to be a valid platform of professional development(Figure 2).

Figure 2: detailed breakdown of different regions of the world where employers consider

MOOCs to be a valid form for professional development.
MOOCs figure 2

3. Most employers would encourage their staff to take MOOCs.

84% of 722 employers surveyed would encourage their staff to take MMOCs. (Figure 3).

Figure 3: Employers who support or encourage staff to take MOOCs

MOOCs figure 3

4. MOOCs completion on a CV is widely considered by employers as a positive factor in recruiting.

As shown in Figure 4, 71% of 875 surveyed employers consider MOOCs completion on a CV as a positive factor in recruiting

Figure 4: Employers who consider MOOCs completion on a CV as a positive factor when recruiting.

MOOCs figure 4

5. Of 887 respondents who answered the question “What are the main areas you would like to see MOOCs developed?” the breakdown was as follows (figure 5):

Figure 5: employers who consider the main areas where they would like to see MOOCs
Developed in line with the needs of respective corporate scenarios:

MOOCs figure 5

Of those selecting ‘other’ – a significant proportion cited areas related to human resources.

24453-32620

Employers Global Salary Trends

Graduate Recruiter October 2014 cover

The Association of Graduate Recruiters(AGR) is an employer-led membership organisation, whose goal is to ensure that all member organisations can recruit and develop the best student talent for their needs and the needs of the UK economy.

With a diverse network of over 700 members, they work closely with employers, the education sector, and supplier partners to represent big employers in the UK.

They invited me to contribute to a special piece on their magazine on the latest IT used in the world of graduate recruitment: Graduate Recruiter. This magazine is published every two months, and is considered as “an essential guide to the latest developments and innovations in graduate recruitment”.The article is published in the October issue of 2014. Here is the original article submit.

You can read the online version of the magazine here.

It is on page 28-29. Here is a scanned view of the two pages here.
employer 7 page 22-23

Employers Global Salary Trends

By Ms. Susan Gatuguta Gitau, Analyst & Project Manager;

& Dr. Christina Yan Zhang, China Director QS Intelligence Unit

salary-survey-2014

The QS Global Employer Survey has been running for the past ten years. In 2014, nearly 29,000 employers from 24 main industries in 134 countries completed the survey, providing invaluable data for the Employer Reputation component of the QS World University Rankings® as well as strategic insight into current recruiter trends.

The value of basic compensation offered by employers in Eastern Europe and Latin America falls below $20,000 per annum. This outcome is mirrored by the findings from the Global Cost of Talent Index from Universum. Students from some countries within these respective regions displayed low salary expectations. The Asia Pacific, Western Europe and US & Canada compensation is valued above the global average while Africa & Middle East falls 5% below the global average.

Chart 1 – Average graduate compensation offered by national, regional and global recruiters

employer 1

The global average salary has steadily increased since 2011 signalling a steady recovery from the deep global recession. The fastest rate of growth was experienced in 2012, this, symptomatic in the uptake of confidence in the global economy.

Chart 2 – Global average salary in US dollars (USD)

employer 2

Northern European employers are seen to offer the highest compensation on the whole, with Denmark and Norway offering the highest salaries. Southern Europe, by contrast, draws the lowest salaries. Countries classified within this sub region i.e. Cyprus, Greece, Italy, Malta, Spain and Turkey have fared poorly in the global recession and are laden with heavy government debt that has had a domino effect on business viability, at the local and national level. Switzerland ($92,550) offers the highest salaries in Western Europe with Swiss respondents displaying a greater preference for Masters Candidates. Swiss employers, furthermore, display steady year on year compensation.

Chart 3 – Average salary in Western Europe

employer 3

Australasian employers (Australia and New Zealand) offer the highest salaries in the Asia Pacific region, approximately$19,000 above the regional average. According to the Australian Graduate Survey, the median starting salary for new bachelor degree graduates aged less than 25 and in their first full-time employment in Australia is AUD $52,450 . At $11,230, Central Asia (Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan) falls far below the regional average salary.

Chart 4 – Average salary in Asia Pacific

employer 4

Comparing local and international employer compensation

The gap between domestic and multinational recruiters is most significant in the Asia Pacific at 27%, equating to a shortfall of $10,000. Comparatively, Western Europe boasts the narrowest gap with local pay at 6% less than their intentional counterparts. Eastern European domestic recruiters exhibit the second highest pay gap at 20% below international recruiters.

Globally, a 35% gap exists between domestic and international employers – however this gap is seen to shrink over time. Multinational companies coordinate recruitment on a global level, and do not want to drive top candidates away from key geographies because of a salary differential. As international companies set up operations in emerging markets, they are increasingly willing to pay more for candidates who they see as critical to establishing a foothold in each region. Over time, it is likely that differentials with local companies will diminish, as they respond by trying to attract talent for equivalent positions globally with more competitive salaries and bonuses.

Chart 5 – Salary differentials between local and multinational employers by region

employer 5

Salaries by industry

The Pharmaceutical sector is the highest paying sector with an average salary of $34,880 and offers the highest average Postgraduate salary at $40,590 (offered by national, regional and global employers). It is the financial industry, who follows a close second in terms of postgraduate salaries, whilst leading with the highest Undergraduate salaries at $31,690. The average starting salary for the Pharmaceutical sector, at $31,570, a mere $120 behind.

In comparison to postgraduate candidates, the highest compensation gap exists in Pharmaceuticals at 29%. A postgraduate degree is equally a favourable option in Consulting, Finance and Other industries, all of whom post an average compensation gap over 20%. Undergraduate and postgraduate salaries are drawn closer in Technology with a 15% compensation gap.

Table 6 – Average salary by industry sector

employer 6

Employers

Interested employers could contact us at Dr. Christina Yan Zhang, China Director, QS Intelligence Unit at Christina@qs.com for other detailed information about various reports QS produced to support employers to identify the best graduates globally.

How are average tuition fees calculated?

by Baerbel Eckelmann

Tuition fees is one type of charge a student has to face in higher education. Tuition fees help to pay for the cost of running a higher education institution, such as salaries for teaching staff or maintaining buildings. There are various ways of calculating the average tuition fees, like: calculation of mean by program, calculation of mean by student, calculation of median and calculation of mode. For example:

a university offers 8 programs with yearly fees of:

MA1 3200, MA2 3200  MA3 3200, MBA 11300, MA4 4300, MA5 4800, MA6 3700, MA7 8200

Mean by student

Multiply the fee level by the number of students paying this fee level and then divide by the total number of students.

Mean by program (do remove extreme outliers)

Add up all yearly fees for each program offered and divide the sum by the number of programs. Should you offer particular programs with an exceptionally high fee, please exclude them from your calculation. This mainly applies to certain medical, law or business programs.

Referring to the example this means: 3200+3200+3200+4300+4800+3700+8200 = 30600

30600 /7 = 4371 

The mean by program is: 4371

Median

The median indicates the centre of the distribution and is preferable in a distribution with outliers. Following the example above it would mean:

 Distribution: 3200 to 11300

 All values in order: 3200+3200+3200+3700+4300+4800+8200+11300


                                                          3700+4300=8000/2=4000

 The median is: 4000

 Mode

 The mode is the value that appears the most. In our example this would be: 3200

 3200 3200 3200 3700 4300 4800 8200 11300

Off-shore campuses and student counts

by Baerbel Eckelmann

Off-shore campuses can be included in the university’s student count as long as the university does NOT qualify domestic students (place where campus is) as international students …

Example: University X in Australia has an off-shore campus in South Africa. It would be wrong if the University X includes all South Africans as international students.

How do you validate directly submitted data?

by Baerbel Eckelmann

Once we have received the data from the institution, either via QS Core system or email, we start the validation process. This means that a member of the QS Intelligence Unit is looking at every single figure submitted by the institution for a particular statistic. The first step in this process is to compare the latest submission against historical records, the university’s website, specialised statistical agencies or other government body websites. In case of the latest submission being significantly higher or lower than previous records we investigate further and seek clarification from the university’s primary research contact. Upon receiving these additional submission notes we conclude on either acceptance or rejection of the data. Occasionally we overwrite direct submissions but such action is documented under ‘validation notes’.

Why is our data still pending?

by Baerbel Eckelmann

We encourage universities to directly submit data into our online database called QS Core. Once done, the status comes up as ‘pending’ and is indicated by a little clock. All data has to go through a validation process before the status changes to ‘accepted’, indicated by a green ‘tick’. The validation is done by a member of the QS Intelligence Unit. Essentially, we focus on validating crucial statistics, which contribute to the compilation of the overall rank position, first followed by all remaining submitted data.